Thursday, December 14, 2017

photo-eye, best books of 2017



photo-eye has just announced their best book list for 2017. Each of the contributors were asked to select three photobooks that were  significant to them. 
You can check out the list HERE.





Thursday, December 7, 2017

Linn Phyllis Seeger - Life On Mars




Linn Seeger travels almost as much as I do - we meet at Photo London and again at Paris Photo. Linn has been chasing photographs in Ireland, Iceland and most recently in Marfa Texas. Below are some images from her series Life on Mars. I like this work! There is a photobook here waiting to get out. Can't wait to see it...













You can see more of Linn's work on her tumblr account HERE. And more on Linn's website HERE. Check these out, well worth a look.

Friday, November 24, 2017

Thomas Ruff at Whitechapel Gallery, London



It was a total pleasure to see the Thomas Ruff show at London's Whitechapel Gallery. I'd expected something rather dry and on the dull side, yes, Ruff dispenses the Dusseldorf look which is let's say, cool and restrained. What blew me away was the depth and extent of Ruff's practice. Ruff experiments with so many different ideas, he's a risk taker and he gets away with it. The work examines the many ways of seeing and expression, yet within disunity there is connection and harmony. The works ask questions - what really are we looking at?  Why are things the way they are? Importantly the pictures somehow subvert the nature of photography, simply because the ideas get in the way. Altogether an outstanding show.

Whitechapel has this to say: Cosmology, suburbia, nudity, utopianism, catastrophe – these are some of the subjects that Thomas Ruff (b. 1958, Germany) addresses in his photographic series, which for almost four decades have investigated the status of the image in contemporary culture. This exhibition will draw from the full range of Ruff’s output: from his acclaimed Portraits – passport-style portraits, reproduced on a huge scale and revealing every surface detail of their subjects, to his most recent press photographs, drawing on newspaper archives from the era of the space race and Hollywood starlets. 

 
Thomas Ruff at Whitechapel Gallery runs until 21 January 2018.

You can see more on the galleries site HERE





Friday, October 27, 2017

London next week, week after Paris...

 
Harvey Benge - London, May 2017

I'm going to be in London next week and the week after in Paris for Paris Photo. If any of my photo friends feel like a beer, glass of wine (or 2) or a coffee, get in touch.

Harvey Benge - Paris, May 2017

Thursday, October 26, 2017

PARIS PHOTO - book signings


Book signing - Thursday Nov 9, 6pm

Paris Photo opens in the Grand Palais in just under 2 weeks... from Thursday November 9 through until Sunday November 12 there are book signings by all your, all my, favorite photographers.
Here, in no particular order, are just a few that are on my shortlist: Joel Meyerowitz, Guy Tillim, Rinko Kawauchi, Antoine d’Agata, David Lynch, Jim Goldberg, Sophie Calle, John Gossage, Koji Onaka, Susan Meiselas, Todd Hido, Roger Ballen, JH Engström. So many books, so little time!

And last but not least. I'll be signing my latest book - THE LAMENT - at Dewi Lewis stand on Thursday the 9th at 6pm... if you're around come and say hello!

You can check out the full list of signing on the Paris Photo website HERE.



Wednesday, October 25, 2017

Photography in Paris in November, the BJP reports

 
Lars Tunbjörk - Stock Brokerage, New York, 1997

Simon Bainbridge interviews Paris Photo directors Florence Bourgeois and Christoph Wiesner in the latest on-line offering from the British Journal of Photography. The article gives an in-depth look at the 21st edition of the world's premier photography fair which returns to Paris 9-12 November.
But there is more... The second edition of the Biennial of Photographers of the Contemporary Arab World at M.E.P. and seven other venues across the city. Noémie Goudal’s latest series, Telluris, created last spring in the Californian desert, complete with an on-site installation at Galerie Les Filles du Calvaire. Raymond Depardon’s Traverser retrospective at the Fondation Cartier-Bresson, Albert Renger Patzsch at the Jeu de Paume, Malick Sidibé’s Mali Twist at Fondation Cartier…

You can read the full story HERE

Monday, October 23, 2017

Why Artists' Books Are as Relevant as Ever...

 
NY Art Book Fair. Image via processandskills.com

In a post by on today's Artspace editor-in-chief Loney Adams talks with Printed Matter's Philip Aarons on Why Artist's Books are as relevant as ever in today's digital world. The piece is a must read for anybody who has ever made a bookwork or is contemplating doing so.

In the introduction to Artists Who Make Books, a brand-new release by Phaidon, co-editor Claire Lehmann writes, “At a time when an artist can utilize a wide miscellany of ways and means—a paintbrush, a custom software program, a camera, a CNC router, a found object—it seems worth asking: What does the artist’s book allow, in structure, expression, or reach?” Though artists have been making books for ages, it seems that with the ubiquity of digital media in 2017, artists have a range of democratic means of not only expressing themselves, but disseminating their work to a broad and diverse audience, diminishing the need for artists books and zines. And yet, artists who have developed their careers in a variety of mediums continue to turn to the book as a medium of many—a vehicle for ideas and expressions outside the confines of the white cube and the politics of the art market.

Joining Lehmann in editing Artists Who Make Books, along with Andrew Ross, is Philip Aarons, a die-hard collector of artists’ books who for years has served as the board chair of Printed Matter (a store-front operation started in the '70s by Sol LeWitt and Lucy Lippard as a headquarters of sorts for all things printed), and is a member of the Museum of Modern Art’s Library and Archive Trustee Committee. His passion for collecting artists’ books is somewhat ironic, considering the inherent exclusivity involved in collecting scarce objects: what excites Aarons’ about books and multiples is their ability to touch the hands of not only wealthy collectors like himself, but also of those who can’t afford to participate in the fine art market—the artist’s friends and peers, young makers, and fans. Artists' books are democratic, tactile, and accessible.

You can read the full article HERE.